Speck of Science 2/19/17 – Denuding Geckos

 

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Photo Credit: A. Anker

A week and half ago multiple science news outlets reported on the publication of a study that described a new species of Geckolepis geckos, a bizarre genus that goes by the more common moniker of “fish-scale” geckos. They appear to be relatively unique to the Comoros Islands and Madagascar, locations that harbor other fascinating endemic species (restricted to a certain region), a fact which can largely be attributed to island isolation.

These lizards are sheathed in a layer of vibrant scales that they jettison quickly in response to perceived predatory threats. Mark Scherz, the PhD candidate who lead-authors the study, experienced significant challenges trying to collect fully-covered specimens of what would later be identified as Geckolepis megalepis. The gecko loses skin with scales, and much resembles a naked baby mouse after the process. As the study notes, “The new species has the largest known body scales of any gecko (both relatively and absolutely), which come off with exceptional ease.”

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Photo credit: F Glaw

This quality of Genus Geckolepis to lose then regenerate scales is suggested to have applications in human medicine with regards to tissue recovery. In addition, geckos have been studied for other enviable qualities including their ability to adhere to vertical surfaces with ease.

 

 

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Discovery from the Otter Side

While this is an amazing story, the urge to not post all the otter jokes is a fight I may lose.

Sherlotter Holmes and John Beaverson

All joking (briefly) aside, the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology just published findings about the otter species Siamogale melilutra as described by Wang et al. Skeletal pieces from three individuals were recovered in western China and used to characterize the ancient otter who outguns the giant river otter of today in size (approximately 50 kg to the giant otter’s 34).

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Giant River Otter. Photo Credit: Ernane Junior, Your Shot, National Geographic

While the specimens had elements reminiscent of both otters and badgers, a few distinctive features allowed researchers to place the animals firmly in subfamily Lutrinae, home to 13 current day otter species. However the paper notes the mixture of characteristics, described in some other genera as well, lead to some interesting questions about the ways in which the two may be related.

On the tail of this amazing find, I share an interesting otter fact which upon learning some years ago, quickly escalated their status in my heart: sea otters have loose folds of skin under their arms they use as pockets for storing food and rocks to use as tools.

I will close with the following video as it would be an otter shame not to: