Speck of Science – 4/19/16 – March of the Crabs

christmas-island-red-crab
Source: Animal Planet

Mass migrations fascinate me – massive swarms of creatures on robotic treks to satisfy deep-seated needs for resources – nature’s automatons reaching for food, for mates, for brighter skies. One of the earliest that captured my attention is expressed in this Animal Planet video documenting the movement of red crabs on Christmas Island:

http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/wild-kingdom/videos/christmas-island-red-crabs/

(Note at 1:40, crustaceans seem to be playing “frogger” while obliviously scuttling across roads and railroad tracks. Not the unexpected result of the clash between crab and human.)

A gif of the oceanic equivalent has made a recent appearance online, showing an endless carpet of sandy colored scuttlers (they were in fact red,  or “tuna,” crabs who appeared that way as they stirred up a the sediment on the sea floor). However, this article sheds more light on the unusual event captured by a manned submersible exploring Hannibal Bank off of Panama (fitting name for the location of a slightly unnerving and intriguing event to occur? ). The following video comes from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institut and features scientist Jesús Pineda explaining the details around recording the migration:

 

 

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Speck of Science – 4/6/2016 – Gimme Back My Buoy

I have been through a blogging dry spell lately, but nothing like starting out again with the amusing news of 2 men essentially holding a USGS (United States Geological Survey) scientific buoy hostage.

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A Map of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute’s Coordinated Canyon Experiment. The buoy was associated with this particular project. Source: MBARI

The buoy, which was deployed to gather data related to El Niño events, drifted off its mooring during a recent storm. Two fishermen chanced upon it, recovered it, and are now demanding $13,000 in exchange for its return. Their lawyer, a seemingly rather colorful character and self-described “old trial dog”, initially set the price a bit higher based on the following mathematics: ” On good days fishing they gross $2,700. Taking the big and gouging thing onto the boat and having it there kept the boat out of action for nine days for a multiply of $24,300. Twenty percent of value would be $80,000. We offer to SELL (you can use any other word you like in an agreement) it to you for $45,000.” One has to wonder why they took it upon themselves to keep the “big and gouging thing” on their boat for nine days in the first place.

The article notes from several sources that salvage laws likely do not apply here, especially as the buoy was never properly abandoned. However, the loss of and tampering with of expensive research equipment has always been a known and pervasive issue in oceanic research.  I for one will be interested to follow the outcome of this eyebrow-raising case.

Speck of Science – 1/11/2016: The Co-evolution of Poachers

I’m a little late in posting about this story that came out in the Guardian on New Year’s Day.

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Colour changing tree monitors or garden lizards annd Bronze skinks hung in a street market to be sold as pets in Hainan province, China. Photograph: Xiao Shibai/Alamy

The gist of the piece is that the journal Zootaxa has published recent papers omitting the data on where the described species may be found. This is to deter impact to these newly described organisms, after several incidences where animals were depleted or found for offer in the pet trade. This goes to show that seemingly the most innocuous and standard scientific practices (in this case, the standard documentation and provision of data surrounding the description of newly identified species) may still warrant ethical considerations.

This also represents an interesting and alarming co-evolution of illegal or unregulated poaching practices. But this is just a drop in the poaching bucket, as poachers have already clearly upped their game in recent years, arming themselves with high-tech equipment like night vision goggles. However, there is a whole range of combatant technologies emerging for use in the anti-poaching effort being billed as “smarter ways to fight wildlife crime.”

 

 

Speck of Science – 1/7/2016: Aye Calypso

Sometimes I come across some interesting news item that I don’t have time to write about in depth but still want to share. I’ve decided to start a new Speck of Science feature on my blog as a way to share brief blips and recaps of internet curiosities and dispatches.

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Today’s item is an article from the Guardian reporting that Jacques Cousteau’s ship, the Calypso, will soon be ready to begin life anew. The ship was downed by an accident and since 2007 had been languishing in a sort of boatyard purgatory due to disagreements over payment and the purpose of its restoration. This is truly exciting news for the continuing legacy of marine exploration, and our care for the world’s oceans.